Pool Brick Makeover

When we got the estimate for our pool resurfacing, I asked for the bricks surrounding the pool and planter to be removed and replaced with flagstone. That alone would have cost $5000 extra, on top of the resurfacing cost. Gulp. I decided I could live with the bricks, but wanted to give them new life. We could have waited till after the pool was resurfaced, but we’d have new tile and I didn’t want to worry about discoloring them.

 

Pool brick before
“Before” photo of the pool brick. And the Fatal 4-Way Handstand Competition
Pool brick before1
Note the sun-bleached and discolored brick

The poor, defenseless brick around my pool gets direct California afternoon sun, beating down on it, everyday, for the last 28 years. Most of it is sun-bleached. The brick-lined planters behind the pool gets more shade, and thus were a different shade of sun-bleachedness.

I googled brick painting and staining, and was admittedly turned off by painting. Probably because many sites I came across had brick painted white, and I didn’t like the flat, uniform look. I looked up brick staining, as I thought it would give me a more natural look, and found I needed to find out if my bricks were sealed or coated first. That would determine if it would accept a stain.

So, I performed a water test. I assumed (incorrectly) that the bricks would be unsealed, as they are right next to the pool. Sealed surfaces= slick surfaces, or so I thought. The water test proved me wrong. I poured a little water on the brick and sure enough, it beaded up rather than absorb into it. Fan-freaking-tastic.

The wonderfully robust internet yielded a few options- test a bit of lacquer thinner on it, repeat the water test, and see if it removed the sealer. Nope. The next step would be to try a commercial sealer remover. As I gazed over the 264 bricks surrounding my pool, I quickly decided I would go with paint. I was not going to even try un-sealing 264 bricks.

We took a trip to Home Depot, and the staff recommended a bonding primer first, followed by the paint. I had forgotten I already had bonding primer from my last project, and ended up buying another one (I’m not bitter).

Behr Bonding Primer

I pressure washed the bricks pretty thoroughly, and hubby trimmed the razor-sharp rosebushes and juniper branches in the planter. I took a regular nylon paintbrush and painted the bonding primer on each brick. Each. And every. Brick. Don’t panic that it looks like skim milk at first- it dries clear.

Now the color. Behr has a wide variety of concrete and masonry paint, and you can choose which finish you prefer. I wanted a low-gloss color, so I chose the “Low Luster” base and had it tinted to “Red Brick”. Pretty fitting, I think.

Porch and Patio Paint-red brick

 

Home Depot staff advised to use a roller, per Behr’s recommendation. I completely ignored this and bought a paintbrush as I thought it would give me more control of the color. I’m glad I did.

I taped around the perimeter of the pool, and then thought I would tape the grout in between the brick. I got through about 7 bricks when I thought “Nope. No more”. It would’ve taken me all day just to tape. So I pulled a classic Amanda move and told myself “just be careful”.

Then I painted. And painted. And painted. Then painted some more. 264 bricks. In the heat. It was the most tedious DIY project thus far. After about 50 bricks I got smart and used a cushion for my knees. Which promptly became spattered with paint. Some of the bricks had gouges and it was difficult to get the paint into, but I kind of liked the look- it looked more “aged”.

After I got all 264 bricks painted (but who’s counting?), I debated about the grout. Should I leave it gray? It didn’t look too bad, but I decided it would bother me to leave it gray. I have an earth-tone theme going in the backyard. It would bug me. Then I lightbulb fired in my exhausted brain- my leftover concrete stain! I had a half a gallon left from the patio resurfacing project. It was the lighter “Saltillo Tile” color, and I thought it would look great with the brick red color.

 

Behr Saltillo
Looks darker than it actually is

I started by using a 1 inch paint brush to apply the stain between the bricks. It colored the grout perfectly, and covered the “oops” paint I got onto the grout (I guess I wasn’t all that careful sometimes). However, the flyaway bristles were getting the stain on the brick. I switched to a foam applicator and it worked much better. Warning: a little concrete stain in a foam applicator goes a long way. Press the excess against the side of the can first.

Foam brush

This was the easiest part of the project, although also tedious. Per Home Depot staff, sealing is not necessary if you use bonding primer. I didn’t want to seal it anyway until after the pool is resurfaced, do I can touch up any dings the brick might sustain.

Here is the finished project!

Pool brick 2Pool brick 3Pool Brick 4Pool brick 5

Pool brick 6
Enzo figuring out the pool sweep

 

 

Pool brick 7Pool brick1

 

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